First Peoples Principles of Learning: Learning ultimately supports the well-being of the self, the family, the community, the land, the spirits, and the ancestors.

First Peoples Principles of Learning

Resources for Art Education

Today I attended an art teachers’ professional development session with the very talented local artist LEE CLAREMONT.  It was a true pleasure to hear her talk and to watch her demonstrate her creative process. When asked about key thoughts for teaching children about First Nations perspectives, she made comments about a couple of common priorities running through the art in many Indigenous cultures. They included storytelling and symbolism, community and sharing, the land, as well as vibrant colour and pattern. She also mentioned the influence of colour and design inspired by beadwork and other handwork processes going back thousands of years.

For teaching, she emphasized how it would be important for children to tell visual stories connected to their own heritage. I would add, that we should always focus on honouring diversity. Art class is the perfect place for learning about each other.

There are many wonderful resources to help us learn about visual storytelling in ancient and contemporary cultures with an emphasis on people of the First Nations.  In class we will look more at this later.

On today’s post I will start to highlight just a few introductory resources, emphasizing  the First Peoples Principles of Learning from the B.C. First Nations Steering Committee, as well as a first stop for local information in our own community.

Museum of Anthropology  – UBC Online Educational Resources
The Sncewips Heritage Museum

A showcase in West Kelowna for the sqilxw (First Nations) people from our area.

https://sncewipsmuseum.org

The First Nations Education Steering Committee (FNESC)

This group has worked to improve the success of all First Nations students in BC. Visit the FNESC.ca website to see new resources as they are added.

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