A Few Favorite Resources for Teachers Making Art with Children . . .

DRAWING ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE BRAIN by BETTY EDWARDS
GO: A KIDD'S GUIDE TO GRAPHIC DESIGN
DRAWING PROJECTS FOR CHILDREN by PAULA BRIGGS
WHAT IT IS by LYNDA BARRY
THE DRAWING PATH for CHILDREN by BOB STEELE
Cartooning: Philosophy and Practice, by Ivan Brunetti

and. . . . . for Parents, Artists, or for Anyone Interested in Creative Processes

DRAWING PROJECTS FOR CHILDREN by PAULA BRIGGSPaula Brigg’s DRAWING PROJECTS FOR CHILDREN book is written for children to use independently or with support. There are also digital teaching resources at her site for the UK charity AccessArt. This was set up with her colleague Sheila Ceccarelli.

Briggs encourages us to raise our expectations about children’s capabilities for making artwork. She models ways to provide focused support along with access to materials, time, space and reasons to explore.

THE DRAWING PATH for CHILDREN by BOB STEELEBob Steele’s DRAWING PATH FOR CHILDREN. This book is available in the Kindle edition through Amazon, or online with Google Books. Print copies are still available for other books by Bob Steele, including A PICTURE BOOK OF CHILDREN’S DRAWINGS.  The Drawing Network website has sample excerpts available to look at online.

WHAT IT IS by LYNDA BARRY

Not long ago, I read the book WHAT IT IS by Lynda Barry, and I immediately became a  fan of her work. She called herself the “Accidental Professor” and also created a book called SYLLABUS, with lesson plans from a course she taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This course was intended for students who doubted that they could write or draw.

Barry’s approach is all about finding the back door, shutting down the inner critic and accessing what she calls the “unthinkable mind.” As a comic artist, Barry is interested in both words and pictures. Her  holistic approach to creative expression offers wonderful ideas for teachers.

She is very interested the reasons many of us stop drawing, and in the ways we can rediscover these abilities. Barry’s Tumblr page also has some interesting examples of creative drawing and writing challenges that she posts for her students. Check out the NEAR SIGHTED MONKEY blog.

10 Design ProjectsGO: A KIDD’S GUIDE TO GRAPHIC DESIGN by Chip Kidd
A Kidd’s Guide to Graphic Design is a clever, engaging design introduction for children aged 10 and above. Some exercises and examples could be valuable even with younger children.

stARTingConsider joining the British Columbia Art Teachers Association, check out their web site and Facebook page or try attending a conference!

At the national level, there is also the Canadian Society for Education Through Art. Articles we will be reading in the art methods course were all written by experienced Canadian art educators. The articles were put together into a book that was published by the CSEA.

BCATA members have also made contributions to help us understand ways to work with the new B.C. curriculum.  INSTRUCTIONAL EXAMPLES have now been uploaded to the Ministry site.

B.C. teachers can also find interesting educational resources on sites from other provinces. For example:

Ontario Education Association Learning Through Arts


Examples of Teaching Resources from Major Museums, Galleries, and Online Platforms

There are many more excellent resources available, including virtual tours from cultural centres all around the world. The best resources are not always the ones that pop up to the top in a browser search. Ask your librarian for guidance when you have a specific project in mind. 

Susan

Canadian painter and mixed-media artist, Susan Neilson is fascinated by natural geometry in micro and macro worlds. Precise realism, calm energy and intuitive abstraction combine in her art. The Pacific Northwest and parks of the British Columbia Interior inspire her current work. She is interested in biomorphic forms and patterns connecting all living systems, as well as the interface between wild and cultivated environments.

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