Colour Gradation Lesson Grade 7

Art Lesson Planning for Teachers

Introductory materials and suggestions for teachers preparing lessons for  learning through art in elementary schools.

Essential Curriculum Resources and Templates

The BC Ministry of Education K-9 Arts Education curriculum site is at http://curriculum.gov.bc.ca.


Helpful refillable lesson template forms for art lessons are posted on the BCATA (BC Art Teacher’s Association) website.


UBC Downloadable Planning Templates


B.C. Unit and Lesson Planning Examples for Teaching Art

Including Cross-Curricular Connections

New Instructional Examples for B.C. Teachers from the Ministry


TEACH BC – Created by the BC Teachers’ Federation, this site is for BC teachers to share resources and research on education.


Intersections 2016 Conference Information October 20-22 in Victoria B.C. – Canadian Society for Education Through Art


A Few Examples of Additional Resources for Art Lesson Inspirations

I created separate blog pages with some recommended art education resources and more could be added here in time:

  1. GENERAL ART RESOURCE IDEAS

  2. FIRST PEOPLES PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING, with resource links

What is the Role of the Art Teacher?

“So How am I Supposed to Do it?

Article on the Practices and Processes for Teaching Art, by Miriam Cooley, from our class text StArting With. . . .

Edited by Kit Grauer, Rita Irwin and Michael Emme, published by the Canadian Society for Education through Art, Victoria, B.C., 2011 

Miriam Cooley emphasizes that the teacher provides leadership, offering guidance in the adventure of learning.

  1. You plan for a variety of learning experiences
  2. You prepare materials and resources
  3. You understand and value student ideas to help “shape the course of the lesson.

Teachers learn along with the children, balancing opportunities that give children both the space and the “push” to help students make their own discoveries.

I would also like to add a fourth point

4. You provide focused support,  while raising expectations of the capabilities and creative thinking possible for each child.


Teaching art is NOT about step-by-step teacher dictated instructions with pre-cut materials.

BUT – It is also not enough to just stand back “hands-off” and expect the learning to spontaneously take-off without adult leadership.


Conversations, Questions and Reflections

Recognize that your leadership engaging children in questions and conversations contributes to the process of learning in and through art.

Teachers who learn about the lives of their students, are able to invite students into processes that build on their experiences, interests and abilities.

Conversations can help to build relationships and help teachers to motivate children with lessons that will be relevant and meaningful.

The Ministry curriculum provides general guidelines, but the teacher personalizes the learning. In the article, Miriam Cooley says that you  “build the bridge between your students and the stated curriculum requirements.”

INTRODUCTORY PROCESSES TO KICKSTART AN ART LESSON

DEMONSTRATION, MINI-LESSON, HANDS-ON WARM-UP ACTIVITY

Mini-lessons could even happen earlier in the day, or the day before your main lesson. 

  1. Quick first demo (hands-on OR artist’s example in a video or other medium) to introduce appropriate and energetic possibilities for using materials and tools. This will prepare for a technique that will be used in the main project later. Whenever possible, try this out yourself ahead of time for your own experience, but also to make sure children will experience success. 
  2. Warm-up activity/ Children try the process, as a follow-up to your first demonstration.
  3. Regroup for another demo and/or discussion, especially if there are more steps, so it is not too confusing all at once.
MOTIVATORS/INSPIRATIONS TO INTRODUCE THE LESSON THEME

This could involve guided imagining, storytelling, looking at artworks, looking at nature, field trips, investigations in other subject areas (i.e. Science experiment, library explorations, symmetry studies in Math, listening to music, etc.). 

CHILDREN RESPOND, EXPERIMENT AND SHARE IDEAS

OPPORTUNITIES FOR DISCUSSION, QUESTIONS, PRACTICE ACTIVITIES OR BRAINSTORMING.

CHILDREN RESPOND, EXPERIMENT AND SHARE IDEAS

OPPORTUNITIES FOR DISCUSSION, QUESTIONS, PRACTICE ACTIVITIES OR BRAINSTORMING.

ACCESS TO TIME AND MATERIALS

With support, encouragement and pauses for additional demos or quick “info- bits” when needed. Pause also as opportunities arise, to point out examples of students experiencing success or students taking work in interesting directions. 

Revisit, add demonstrations, and/or invite students to share their understanding

As you build on the lesson, add challenges, or clarify the direction.  

OPPORTUNITIES FOR SHARING, DISPLAY, COMMUNITY INTERACTION, ASSESSMENT THAT ACKNOWLEDGES OUTCOMES ACHIEVED

These are all connected to the experience and the learning process, but they are a topic for our group to discuss on another day!

 

WRAP-UP

Remember that clean-up is a lesson in itself. Children need clear instructions and demonstrations to learn how to take good care of the materials, showing leadership and consideration for safety and group co-operation.

Try to always leave a little time for questions, discussion and feedback opportunities before students race out the door. 

Susan

Canadian painter and mixed-media artist, Susan Neilson is fascinated by natural geometry in micro and macro worlds. Precise realism, calm energy and intuitive abstraction combine in her art. The Pacific Northwest and parks of the British Columbia Interior inspire her current work. She is interested in biomorphic forms and patterns connecting all living systems, as well as the interface between wild and cultivated environments.

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